Drug Rehab Spanish Fork Utah


 
 
 
 

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Addiction Treatment Program | Addiction Treatment Center Spanish Fork UT 84660

 

 

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Drug Rehab Spanish Fork, Utah 84660

Drug Addiction Rehab in Spanish Fork is an issue greatly impacting the lives of individuals and families. The most pressing question is why, and what could have been done to prevent an unnecessary death. Within this paper, the process of developing an outreach program tailored to a high-risk population will be delineated. The social and economic justice issues contained in the body of the program will be addressed, as well as, the PREPARE and IMAGINE processes. Additionally, the allocation of a $100,000 budget will be itemized, in order to provide an explanation of the perquisites and materials required for the program to function.

Target Population

Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork has become a national epidemic. The effects of Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork attempts and deaths are pervasive. Whether the system affected is the family of the deceased, or the mental health system addressing treatment, the subject is not tackled nearly enough. As a society we have learned to deal with our problems quietly and inconspicuously.

Unfortunately, treating Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork as a taboo subject may aid in the 32,000 Drug Addicts in Spanish Fork deaths America experiences every year. This number equates to roughly 89 Drug Addiction in Spanish Forks per day or one Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork every 16 minutes (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2005). Addressing the issues related to Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork requires an honest assessment of the gaps visible in Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork prevention and education.

Now to narrow the national focus to local statistics; Utah experiences the 8th highest Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rate in the country. Deaths by Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork in Utah equate to 17.08 deaths to every 100,000 persons, contrasting the national average of 10.75 deaths to every 100,000 (Utah Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork Prevention Plan, 2007).  Surprisingly, national and local Drug Addiction in Spanish Forks are committed predominately by males. U.S. statistics place males at 78.8% (Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, 2005) of all successful Drug Addiction in Spanish Forks, and local numbers at an astounding 81% (Utah Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork Prevention Plan, 2007). With these statistics in mind, why are men so much more likely to kill themselves?

With various factors aiding to a high male Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rate, it’s beneficial to first identify that female Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork attempts are two to three times higher than those of men. With women trying more often, how is it that men are more successful? Are men just go-getters who are capable of getting the job done, or are there a host of socialization factors that come into play? George E. Murphy M.D. provides insight as to why men often kill themselves, while women engage in more attempts. 

As stated previously it would be easy to make the sexist assumption that men are just more efficient. Conversely, Murphy states women are more likely to attempt, than to commit Drug Treatment in Spanish Fork for several reasons. First, women are more inclusive in their relationships, and willing to process with friends and family. Second, women are more likely to seek help. Third, Alcohol Addiction in Spanish Fork attempts are typically symbolic during a period of emotional crisis, and induce drastic life changes (Murphy, 1998). Essentially, this reiterates what most are already aware of: women are more willing to express their emotions, and take the feelings of others into account. Dr. Murphy explains men are less likely to assess the effects of their actions on the lives of family and friends. The decision to commit Substance Abuse in Spanish Fork is a personal choice for men, and they do not feel compelled to divulge their plans to anyone else. Contrasting women, men are less likely to seek advice. The perception that help equates to weakness, leads men to deal with their struggles internally. With the thought processes of men in mind, without generalizing the whole population, it will be beneficial to identify possible risk factors leading men to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork

The possible factors associated with male Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork are: 

· Using drugs and/or alcohol to help cope with emotions, relationships, pressure of work etc

· Social isolation, living alone

· Unable to form or sustain meaningful relationships

· Divorce or relationship breakdowns

· A history of physical and sexual abuse

· Imprisonment

· Mental illness, particularly where this is related to depression. Painful and/or debilitating

  illnesses or conditions

· Being bullied at school/college/work.

· Unemployment

· Loss of a loved one through trauma or disease (National Institute of Mental Health, 2008)

 

These issues appear pervasive across all age groups, but particularly between the ages of 30-49 years of age. Nonetheless in 2005, 89% of teenage Drug Addiction in Spanish Forks were committed by males, indicating intervention is required across generations (Kinkead & Romboy, 2006). Lastly, an additional common thread linking males with high Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rates, are the lethal means utilized during the Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork.  

The Utah Heroin Addiction in Spanish Fork Prevention Plan states the top three methods of committing Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork in Utah are through the use of firearms, poison, and suffocation. With males at the highest risk of committing Marijuana Addiction in Spanish Fork, it is essential to address the most lethal, and prominently used method: firearms. In Utah there are over 80,000 individuals with concealed weapons permits, and that number excludes gun owners who chose not to apply for the permit (Bernick Jr., 2007). With an overwhelming number of gun owners in Utah, it is imperative to educate our target population on gun safety, and the predominant use of firearms in committing Alcohol Rehab in Spanish Fork. The benefits of providing an intervention to this population will be extremely imperative.

In providing males ages 13-49 with the education to identify warning signs they may be headed towards self-harm. We can also provide a way to work around the machismo, and help men seek assistance when they desperately need it. Providing education to health care providers is a very important aspect of Drug and Alcohol Addiction in Spanish Fork prevention, however, our program intervenes where the problem begins: with the individual. Men require the information to know what are the warning signs, who can they speak with, how can they help themselves, and where can they go to receive assistance. Lastly, the target population will benefit from the knowledge this is a problem many men face, and weakness is not a part of the equation. Men can utilize the information provided, and no longer feel isolated in their struggle with negative emotions. 

Social and Economic Justice

The mission of our intervention is to provide vital information to a high-risk population. As social workers it is our ethical duty to provide services for those in need, and if the services do not exist, we must create them. Males have typically received a disproportionate amount of consideration in terms of their needs. However, as times have evolved and women have become increasingly influential, the ideals of society have slowly begun to change. Despite this change, the social expectations of men have remained, in large-part, stagnant.

Masculinity has been defined by pop-culture icons, delineating a man as the voice of reason, emotionally resilient, and dependable. This image is socially embedded as little boys fantasize about gun fights, and women role play as mothers. Men are taught as soon as they are capable of understanding, that certain emotions such as anger and happiness are normal, while all others should be disclosed inconspicuously. 

While a great deal of social work interventions focus on reversing the affects of patriarchal values and institutional discrimination, it is nonetheless imperative to ensure the needs of all populations are adequately met. This project ensures social justice by facing head-on, the same patriarchal values that have oppressed women, and have led men to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork at a rate four times higher than women. Although patriarchy is commonly associated with the derogatory implications the ideology has on women, and rightly so, traditional male role expectations can have equally devastating effects.

An empirical study confirmed traditional male role expectations, indeed contribute to the Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rate among men. The study examined 40 men who were hospitalized after a Addiction in Spanish Fork attempt, and 40 men with no history of Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork attempts (Houle, Mishara & Chagnon et al., 2008). Those who had attempted Drug Addiction Spanish Fork were assessed as to how strictly they adhered to traditional male role expectations. Other areas evaluated the individual’s views of social support, help seeking behaviors, mental health and Drug Addiction Treatment in Spanish Fork. In the end, statistical evidence was provided, confirming a link between adhering to traditional male role expectations and Drug Addiction Rehab in Spanish Fork. Namely, these expectations worked to minimize feelings of loneliness, desperation, etc., and hindered participants from seeking help (Houle, Mishara & Chagnon et al., 2008).  

The program’s objective is to address these issues by exposing the importance of identifying harmful thoughts and feelings, seeking social support, and accepting help from others. While this may contradict what traditional society has ingrained within the minds of some men, it is our obligation to address inequality in its many diverse forms. In addition to helping alleviate the pressures of social conformity, our project may aid in dealing with the pressures of economic inequality. 

One of the longstanding expectations of men is to not only provide financially for their families, but to be successful. Success in the United States is measured by income and possessions. While men are expected to provide these status symbols, many are unable to do so. This is of course another aspect of traditional male role expectations we hope to address. Perhaps not overtly, but through recognition many other men are going through similar circumstances, and the most effective way to alleviate the stress associated with perceived failure, is to provide an outreach system. In addition to assisting men in discovering means of support, our drug rehab program can act as a broker by referring men to various resources providing economic relief.  Lastly, this program will ensure interventions are culturally sensitive, by researching the practices and values of the men we are assisting. We are aware marginalized groups suffer the effects of various forms of discrimination. In providing outreach to disenfranchised groups or individuals, we will address ways of coping with these issues, as an alternative to Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. 

Agency Description

Addiction in Spanish Fork Outreach and Education Prevention (SOEP), is an outreach program tailored specifically to males between the ages of 13-49, in order to narrow down our target population. The services provided will include going directly to the clients at work, school, prisons, churches, etc., to link our client system with information, resources, and services. Information will include age appropriate presentations to both adolescent and male adults providing: Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork warning signs, pamphlets withHeroin Addiction in Spanish Fork risk assessment, coping strategies, and links to resources. We purposely eliminated overhead by going to the client system, instead of securing a permanent location. Our pro-active approach excludes unnecessary costs, and enables the SOEP volunteers to reach a wider client base. SOEP curriculum will emphasize the importance of interpersonal relationships, and disclosing negative emotions to health care providers.  

Our program hopes to maintain a consistent volunteer base through internships, and Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) practicum students. In providing an essential service, students can obtain invaluable experience, by educating a population at-risk, and linking them with necessary resources. We anticipate great success with this program, and hope to expand services to women after the completion of our first pilot year.

 

PREPARE PROCESS

Step 1:  Identify PROBLEMS to address:

 

Substep 1.1:  Evaluate potential for macro level intervention.

 

  1. a.)How heavily is the problem affecting the clients’ well being?

Extremely important; literally life or death.

 

  1. a.)Is the problem serious enough to merit a macro change?

Definitely a must have, all practice levels involved would benefit.

 

  1. a.)Are you willing to think through and appraise your actual potential to make a difference?

This outreach program could actually help save more lives.

 

  1. a.)Are you certain your clients would support such a macro change that is in their best interest?

Our client system might be resistant to change but will at lest have access to the resources.

 

Substep 1.2:  Define and prioritize the problems.

 

  1. a.)What client population will be affected?

Utah males of all ages, primarily 13-49 years old.

 

  1. a.)What type of problem is it?

Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork (Mental health/Depression, etc.).

 

  1. a.)What is the root of the problem?

Lack of education/resources/services to assist in underlying mental health issues.

 

Substep 1.3:  Translate the problems into needs.

 

  1. a.)Get background data and information to clarify exactly what the need is.

Utah leads the nation for one of the highest Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rates.  Males are four times more likely to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork than females.  Therefore we need to be proactive in providing mental health support and in educating and linking males to the needed resources in hopes of reducing Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rates.  

 

  1. a.)Recognize and specify other agencies or programs in the community that already address the need.

Other programs such as the National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI) and Voices of Hope, help all age groups but mainly focus on teen Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork prevention.  Teen Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork is high, but the highest rates in all categories are in Males.  The core or our program and emphasis will be directed toward males.  No other program strictly focuses on the male population.  We will outreach and educate males in school and college, jail and prison, and in the work force by showing the risk factors of Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork and providing resources they can turn to for help.  We will teach them how to deal with the intense feelings (depression, loneliness, and/or worthlessness) they might have in an alternative healthy manner.  

 

  1. a.)Talk to other professionals serving similar clients.

Professionals we could get advice from are: counselors in schools, therapists from different mental health facilities (Valley mental Health, etc.), Martha Anderson- Division of mental health, suicidologist- Doug Gray from the University of Utah, Michelle Moskos- Voices of Hope, Sherri Wittwer- NAMI, and Ron Stromberg- Mental Health Specialist.  All of these individuals are professionals in Utah Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork and could give us a greater perception of what is needed.

 

  1. a.)Get clients involved.

We could get teachers and parents involved by educating them on the signs and symptoms of Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork.  Also, inform teachers and parents what to do if they recognize these signs (link them to resources).  Educate those incarcerated as well as their prison workers.  Talk to community businesspeople and church groups.

 

  1. a.)Consider the value of a more formal needs assessment.

Research in this field is crucial.  We could ask professionals of each area:  schools, businesses, prisons, and churches what they believe might influence mental illness in males that would cause them to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork.

 

Substep 1.4:  Determine which need(s) you will address.

      Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork prevention, outreach, and provide access to 

      resources/services/education. 

 

Step 2:  Review your macro and personal REALITY:

 

Substep 2.1:  Evaluate the organizational and other macro variables potentially working for or against you in the macro change process.

 

 

Variable

 

Brief Description

Extremely Positive

Mildly Positive

Mildly Negative

Extremely Negative

Resources (Funding)

 

 

Grant/donor based

 

 

X

 

 

Constraining Regulations or Laws

 

 

None aware of

 

X

 

 

 

 

Political Climate of other Agencies

 

 

None should argue cause/purpose

 

 

X

External Political Climate

 

Families/Communities should be very supportive/appreciative

 

X

Other Factors

 

Participation among client system

 

X

 

Substep 2.2:  Assess your personal reality (Strengths/weaknesses that may act for/against a successful change effort).  

This program can be very effective in helping to save lives; particularly the client system we have chosen.  Most men are introverted and unwilling to discuss their personal mental health issues.  Because our program does not deal with too many finances, it has the potential for a lasting success.

 

Step 3:  ESTABLISH primary goal(s):

 

  1. a.)What is required to fulfill your identified needs?

Funds; Professionals; Marketing/Advertising; Cooperation from communities and organizations.

 

  1. a.)What goals do you think you might be able to accomplish in your own macro environment?

Rally support, grant writing and volunteers.

 

Step 4:  Identify relevant PEOPLE of influence:

 

  1. a.)Who might be available to help you make the change you have

       identified? 

       Members in already existing Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork programs, political figures, as      

       well as the community at large. 

    

 

Potential Action Systems and Support:

 

 

Names

 

Very Good

 

Mildly Good

 

Mildly Bad

 

Very Bad

Individuals in Organization(s)

 

Andrea, Benjamin, Josh, Spencer and Trudy Moore 

 

X

 

Groups in the Organization(s)

 

Non-affiliated

 

X

 

Individuals in the Community

 

Ron Stromberg, Michelle Moskos, Doug Gray, Martha Anderson, Sherri Wittwer

 

X

 

Groups in the Community

 

Valley Mental Health, Voices of Hope, NAMI, Division of Mental Health, Court system, Churches, Dept. of Human Services, Schools and Universities

 

X

Others

 

Any interested

X

 

Step 5:  ASSESS potential costs and benefits to clients and agency:

 

  1. a.)Will the results be worth it?

This program is drastically needed due to Utah demographics.

 

  1. a.)Would alternative solutions produce more benefits at less cost?

The alternative is for the clients to either admit themselves or to be court ordered for help in an already existing treatment center, which is much more costly.

 

  1. a.)Who gets the benefits and who pays the costs?

The individual suffering with ideations is the greatest beneficiary, but their family and loved ones will also profit from our program.  Because our program is a proactive outreach, the cost is merely nothing more than time the client spends in utilizing our services.

 

Step 6:  Review professional and personal RISK:

 

  1. a.)To what extent are you at risk of losing your job?

None.

 

  1. a.)To what extent will such macro change efforts decrease your potential for upward mobility?

If anything, this experience in creating such a program will help future opportunities for upward mobility.

 

  1. a.)To what extent would your efforts for macro change seriously strain your interpersonal relationships at work? 

Everyone surrounding should be very supportive of such a program.

 

 

To what extent are you in danger of:

 

No Danger

Some Danger

Moderate Danger

Serious Danger

Losing your job?

 

 

X

 

 

 

Decreasing your potential for upward mobility?

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

Seriously straining work relationships?

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Step 7:  EVALUATE the potential success of a macro change process:

 

Substep 7.1:  Review the prior PREPARE PROCESS and weigh the pros and cons of proceeding with the macro change process.

 

PROS:

 

  1. 1.)Client need.

Immense and beyond our current client system.

 

  1. 1.)Positive organizational and other variables.

Support should be given from many different variables.

 

  1. 1.)Your own strengths.

True desire and dedication to help start new program.

 

  1. 1.)Potential support from people from influence.

Support should be given from many various professionals.

 

  1. 1.)Potential financial benefits.

Hopefully can be successful enough to produce a residual income from grants and donors to maintain programs existence.

 

CONS:

 

  1. 1.)Negative organizational and other macro variables.

None

 

  1. 1.)Your own weaknesses.

Novice social workers attempting to create a macro change for the entire state of Utah (Inexperience).

 

  1. 1.)Potential resistance.

Clients might be unwilling to reveal feelings and/or receive assistance before it is too late.  Businesses/schools, etc. might be difficult in scheduling presentations.

 

  1. 1.)Financial costs.

Most of the overhead is from marketing (Pamphlets, and hired professionals).

 

  1. 1.)Your risk.

Possible failure.

 

    1. 1.)Continue with macro change process.

    2. 2.)Postpone macro change process.

    3. 3.)Terminate macro change process.

  1.  

Substep 7.2:  Identify possible macro change approaches to use roughly, estimate their effectiveness, and select the most appropriate one(s).  

1.)  Present to local businesses, schools (Junior and High, Colleges and Universities) and  

      especially to establishments where our client system is found most often.

a.)  Could be hard to schedule appointments, but appears effective. 

 

2.)  Produce mass advertising through pamphlets, billboard, radio and possibly television.

a.)  Can be costly but would definitely get the word out.

 

3.)  Fundraisers, rallies and community meetings to raise awareness.

a.)  Might not be as effective but could help.

 

4.)  Research to discover further insight into cause, as well as best preventions.

a.)  This is extremely important but might be difficult to study.

 

5.)  “No questions asked firearm buyback” to lessen amount of weapons available. 

a.)  Would lower amount of weapons on street but might be illegal.

 

6.)  Provide a self-psychological exam people could take concerning their risk factor with  

      mental health and Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork.

a.)  Would go great with a pamphlet, especially for the introverted.

 

7.)  Create a user-friendly website that provides access to many different   

       resources/services.

a.)  Can be very helpful as long as people know of its existence. 

 

8.)  Establish support groups and sponsors for those already struggling with ideations. 

a.)  Could be hard to find volunteers/professionals and/or fund.

 

9.)  Create fun outdoor/ indoor activities/programs that showcase the beauty of life.

a.)  Would really help with state of mind but might be hard to

       choreograph.

 

10.)  Provide assistance beyond mental health expertise (Financial advising, debt 

        consolidation, etc.).

a.)  Would be a great service but stems away from mental health focus.

 

11.)  Set up a building that specifically deals with this issue.  It would have a 24-hour 

        help line, professional therapists on call and give access to the many different  

        resources and services.

    1. a.)The overhead would eliminate all available funds for actual help.

  1.  

 

 

 

 

 

As stated previously it would be easy to make the sexist assumption that men are just more efficient. Conversely, Murphy states women are more likely to attempt, than to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork for several reasons. First, women are more inclusive in their relationships, and willing to process with friends and family. Second, women are more likely to seek help. Third, Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork attempts are typically symbolic during a period of emotional crisis, and induce drastic life changes (Murphy, 1998). Essentially, this reiterates what most are already aware of: women are more willing to express their emotions, and take the feelings of others into account. Dr. Murphy explains men are less likely to assess the effects of their actions on the lives of family and friends. The decision to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork is a personal choice for men, and they do not feel compelled to divulge their plans to anyone else. Contrasting women, men are less likely to seek advice. The perception that help equates to weakness, leads men to deal with their struggles internally. With the thought processes of men in mind, without generalizing the whole population, it will be beneficial to identify possible risk factors leading men to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. 

The possible factors associated with male Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork are: 

· Using drugs and/or alcohol to help cope with emotions, relationships, pressure of work etc

· Social isolation, living alone

· Unable to form or sustain meaningful relationships

· Divorce or relationship breakdowns

· A history of physical and sexual abuse

· Imprisonment

· Mental illness, particularly where this is related to depression. Painful and/or debilitating

  illnesses or conditions

· Being bullied at school/college/work.

· Unemployment

· Loss of a loved one through trauma or disease (National Institute of Mental Health, 2008)

 

These issues appear pervasive across all age groups, but particularly between the ages of 30-49 years of age. Nonetheless in 2005, 89% of teenage Drug Addiction in Spanish Forks were committed by males, indicating intervention is required across generations (Kinkead & Romboy, 2006). Lastly, an additional common thread linking males with high Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rates, are the lethal means utilized during the Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork.  

The Utah Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork Prevention Plan states the top three methods of committing Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork in Utah are through the use of firearms, poison, and suffocation. With males at the highest risk of committing Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork, it is essential to address the most lethal, and prominently used method: firearms. In Utah there are over 80,000 individuals with concealed weapons permits, and that number excludes gun owners who chose not to apply for the permit (Bernick Jr., 2007). With an overwhelming number of gun owners in Utah, it is imperative to educate our target population on gun safety, and the predominant use of firearms in committing Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. The benefits of providing an intervention to this population will be extremely imperative.

In providing males ages 13-49 with the education to identify warning signs they may be headed towards self-harm. We can also provide a way to work around the machismo, and help men seek assistance when they desperately need it. Providing education to health care providers is a very important aspect of Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork prevention, however, our program intervenes where the problem begins: with the individual. Men require the information to know what are the warning signs, who can they speak with, how can they help themselves, and where can they go to receive assistance. Lastly, the target population will benefit from the knowledge this is a problem many men face, and weakness is not a part of the equation. Men can utilize the information provided, and no longer feel isolated in their struggle with negative emotions. 

Social and Economic Justice

The mission of our intervention is to provide vital information to a high-risk population. As social workers it is our ethical duty to provide services for those in need, and if the services do not exist, we must create them. Males have typically received a disproportionate amount of consideration in terms of their needs. However, as times have evolved and women have become increasingly influential, the ideals of society have slowly begun to change. Despite this change, the social expectations of men have remained, in large-part, stagnant.

Masculinity has been defined by pop-culture icons, delineating a man as the voice of reason, emotionally resilient, and dependable. This image is socially embedded as little boys fantasize about gun fights, and women role play as mothers. Men are taught as soon as they are capable of understanding, that certain emotions such as anger and happiness are normal, while all others should be disclosed inconspicuously. 

While a great deal of social work interventions focus on reversing the affects of patriarchal values and institutional discrimination, it is nonetheless imperative to ensure the needs of all populations are adequately met. This project ensures social justice by facing head-on, the same patriarchal values that have oppressed women, and have led men to commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork at a rate four times higher than women. Although patriarchy is commonly associated with the derogatory implications the ideology has on women, and rightly so, traditional male role expectations can have equally devastating effects.

An empirical study confirmed traditional male role expectations, indeed contribute to the Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rate among men. The study examined 40 men who were hospitalized after a Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork attempt, and 40 men with no history of Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork attempts (Houle, Mishara & Chagnon et al., 2008). Those who had attempted Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork were assessed as to how strictly they adhered to traditional male role expectations. Other areas evaluated the individual’s views of social support, help seeking behaviors, mental health and Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. In the end, statistical evidence was provided, confirming a link between adhering to traditional male role expectations and Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. Namely, these expectations worked to minimize feelings of loneliness, desperation, etc., and hindered participants from seeking help (Houle, Mishara & Chagnon et al., 2008).  

The program’s objective is to address these issues by exposing the importance of identifying harmful thoughts and feelings, seeking social support, and accepting help from others. While this may contradict what traditional society has ingrained within the minds of some men, it is our obligation to address inequality in its many diverse forms. In addition to helping alleviate the pressures of social conformity, our project may aid in dealing with the pressures of economic inequality. 

One of the longstanding expectations of men is to not only provide financially for their families, but to be successful. Success in the United States is measured by income and possessions. While men are expected to provide these status symbols, many are unable to do so. This is of course another aspect of traditional male role expectations we hope to address. Perhaps not overtly, but through recognition many other men are going through similar circumstances, and the most effective way to alleviate the stress associated with perceived failure, is to provide an outreach system. In addition to assisting men in discovering means of support, our program can act as a broker by referring men to various resources providing economic relief.  Lastly, this program will ensure interventions are culturally sensitive, by researching the practices and values of the men we are assisting. We are aware marginalized groups suffer the effects of various forms of discrimination. In providing outreach to disenfranchised groups or individuals, we will address ways of coping with these issues, as an alternative to Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. 

Agency Description

Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork Outreach and Education Prevention (SOEP), is an outreach program tailored specifically to males between the ages of 13-49, in order to narrow down our target population. The services provided will include going directly to the clients at work, school, prisons, churches, etc., to link our client system with information, resources, and services. Information will include age appropriate presentations to both adolescent and male adults providing: Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork warning signs, pamphlets with Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork risk assessment, coping strategies, and links to resources. We purposely eliminated overhead by going to the client system, instead of securing a permanent location. Our pro-active approach excludes unnecessary costs, and enables the SOEP volunteers to reach a wider client base. SOEP curriculum will emphasize the importance of interpersonal relationships, and disclosing negative emotions to health care providers.  

Our program hopes to maintain a consistent volunteer base through internships, and Bachelors of Social Work (BSW) practicum students. In providing an essential service, students can obtain invaluable experience, by educating a population at-risk, and linking them with necessary resources. We anticipate great success with this program, and hope to expand services to women after the completion of our first pilot year

 

IMAGINE PROCESS

 

Step 1:  Start with an innovative IDEA:

 

  1. a.)Weigh strengths and weaknesses:  Easily supported with minimal interference and resistance.

 

  1. a.)Weigh risks and benefits:  Virtually no risks with many benefits.

 

c.)  Determine if the plan will involve a policy, project, or program   

change:  There is nothing existing like this at the time, so it consists of creating a new program.

 

Step 2:  MUSTER support and formulate an action system:

 

  1. 1.)Macro client system:  Utah males of all ages ranging from 13 – 49 years old.

 

  1. 1.)Change agent system:  Small group of social work students and professor.

 

  1. 1.)Target system:  Utah male Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork and mental health.

 

  1. 1.)Action system:  Programs such as the National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI), Voices of Hope, Valley mental Health, Division of mental health, University of Utah, Churches, Schools and Colleges, Department of Human Services, penal and court systems.

 

    1. a.)5 people until implementation:  Andrea Jones, Benjamin Jones, Josh Watkins, Spencer Anderson and Trudy Moore.

  1.  

    1. a.)People who get along and communicate.

    2. b.)People with similar power.

    3. c.)Include people who can only make limited commitments.

    4. d.)Keep communication open.

  2.  

Step 3:  Identify ASSETS:

 

 

Funding

Time

Office Space

Personnel

Volunteers

Skills

 

$100,000 grant

 

Anytime available to offer services

 

 

None

Currently our original five with room for growth

 

All those seriously interested

 

Social work knowledge

 

 

Step 4:  Specify GOALS, objectives, and action steps to attain them:

 

  1. 1.)Primary goal(s) are broken down into objectives.

a.)  Present to local businesses, schools (Junior and High, Colleges and   

      Universities) and especially to establishments where our client   

      system is found most often.

 

b.)  Produce mass advertising through pamphlets, billboard, radio and 

      possibly television.

 

c.)  Fundraisers, rallies and community meetings to raise awareness.

 

d.)  Research to discover further insight into cause, as well as best  

      preventions.

 

                        e.)  Provide a self-psychological exam individuals could take concerning 

                              their risk factor with mental health and Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork.

 

                         f.)  Create a user-friendly website that provides access to many different   

       resources/services.

 

g.)  Establish support groups and sponsors for prevention and those  

      already struggling with ideations.

 

  1. 1.)Objectives are broken down into action steps.

    1. a.)Develop specific programs to present for both teens and adult males.  Schedule meetings to present for the entire upcoming year.  

  2.  

    1. a.)Organize pamphlet layout and contact best printing company.

  3.  

    1. a.)Assign individuals to create agenda for community gatherings and  

  4.       fundraisers.

 

d.)  Assign/hire individual(s) to start research for project.

 

e.)  Hire a licensed individual to create a brief test to gauge Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork risk.

 

f.)  Create layout and contact X-Mission or other such companies to build  

      a webpage.

 

g.)  Create a volunteer sheet and/or find professionals willing to support 

       program.

 

  1. 1.)Action steps (Who will do what by when).

    1. a.)Benjamin Jones, Spencer Anderson, Trudy Moore, Josh Watkins and Andrea Jones will do extensive research and develop both programs through trial and error to present by January 1st, 2009.  During this time Andrea Jones and Josh Watkins will have scheduled presentations one visit per week for the entire year of 2009.

  2.  

b.)  Benjamin Jones will have the pamphlet layout proofread and designed 

      no later than July 7th, 2008.  Upon completion Benjamin will locate the   

      best option for printing and distributing the pamphlets.

 

c.)  Josh Watkins and Andrea Jones will develop a plan for creating a fun 

      and energetic forum for multiple activities such as fundraisers, 

      community awareness, etc. no later than July 7th, 2008.

 

d.)  Andrea Jones, Spencer Anderson, Benjamin Jones and Josh Watkins 

      will be responsible for conducting research either through their own

      efforts, or through past literature no later than January 1st, 2009.  They  

      will also continue ongoing research for an unknown amount of time

      documenting any and all pertinent information.     

 

e.)  Trudy Moore will be responsible for hiring the appropriate  

      professional(s) for creating a self-examination in order for individuals   

      to gauge their risk factor for Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork no later than June 30th, 2008 in  

     order for Benjamin to have it incorporated into the pamphlet.  

 

f.)  Spencer Anderson will meet up with Benjamin and correlate the 

      pamphlet to match up with the webpage by June 30th, 2008.  After, 

      Spencer will contact the most appropriate company to establish a user-

      friendly website and have it completed no later than July 30th, 2008.

 

g.)  Josh Watkins will be responsible for producing a volunteer sign-up 

      sheet as well as distributing it locally.  The sheet will be used  

      indefinitely but will be completed no later than April 28th, 2008.  Josh 

                              will also be in charge of locating professional volunteers and will  

                              create a second method to do so which will also be ongoing and due by 

                              April 28th, 2008.

 

Step 5:  IMPLEMENT the plan:  Everybody must accomplish their duties on time.

 

Step 6:  NEUTRALIZE opposition:  Avoid opposing forces, and prepare for the future funding before the current grant expires.

 

Step 7:  EVALUATE the progress/success of the program/policy change:  Compare Utah Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork 2009 statistics to that of 2008 and prior years.

 

Allocation of funds

 

Our expenses will be divided by personnel salaries and operating expenses. The personnel salaries will include hiring licensed clinical social workers (LCSW) on call and as needed. Our clinicians will specialize in the mental health field, and will be competent to conduct screenings for those at risk for Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. Additionally, the LCSW’s will be on call for clients’ emergencies and will facilitate support when appropriate. We will pay the LCSW $20 per every hour of service rendered. An estimated $25,000 will be set aside to pay our LCSW’s for the 2009 fiscal year.

Our remaining budget will be allocated towards operating expenses. A website is an effective tool for our program to educate the public about Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork prevention. We will use XMission to build and maintain our website. Each subtotal is divided in total costs of $34/month, which combines to a total of $410 per year. Because education is the central focus of our program, a tenth of our budget will go towards pamphlets. We plan to use $10,000 towards creating and printing pamphlets for distribution at schools, businesses, and prisons in Utah. Also, $5,000 will go towards printing expenses, such as photocopies. As a non-profit organization our primary staff will donate their time and will be reimbursed for gas and transportation. We will distribute $100 per month, a grand total of $1,200 a year, for gas and transportation of volunteers. Also, $2,000 will be budgeted for insurance and Federal and State taxes. A grant relief fund of $6,390 will be set up for those struggling financially, and cannot afford to pay for support groups or classes. And finally we will leave a rainy day fund of $20,000 for unexpected expenditures.  

Lastly, $25,000 will be allocated towards the research and design of the outreach curriculum. Though general information will be provided during each outreach session, specific issues affecting various populations (i.e. adolescents) will have to have to be tailored within each presentation. Accordingly, $8,000 will be used for purchasing a projector and laptop, used to present outreach information. An additional $2,000 will be allocated for obtaining necessary office supplies (i.e. pens, paper, etc.).  

 

Personnel Salaries

 Description 

 Cost 

Research 

 On-going studies and curriculum design

$25,000 

On call LCSW 

$20 per hour service rendered

$25,000 

 

 

 

Operating Expenses

 Description 

 Cost

Gas/ Transportation 

$100/ month

$1,200 

Insurance and Taxes

 

$2,000 

Unknown/ Rainy Day 

 

$20,000 

Website 

$34/ month 

$410 

Pamphlets 

 

$10,000 

Grant Relief Fund

 

$6,390 

Presentation materials

 Lap-top/Projector, etc.

                   $8,000

Office Supplies

Pen, paper, etc.

                  $2,000

 

 

 

 

Total grant funds 

$100,000 

 

 

Conclusion

Utah has the 8th highest Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork rate in the country. Males commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork at a rate four times higher than women. The factors contributing to this disparity include traditional male role expectations, and the reluctance of men to seek help or social support. The social and economic justice issues addressed by implementing this project will ensure an at-risk population receives services, in addition to deconstructing the values associated with patriarchy. With a budget of $100,000, SOEP will provide education, outreach, and links to services for the client system. This is a unique program, targeting a population requiring the education to reduce the likelihood of committing Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork in response to an individual’s crisis.

 

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2007). Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork: Facts at a Glance. Retrieved March 

7, 2008, from http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/dvp/Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork/Drug Addiction in Spanish ForkDataSheet.pdf

 

Utah Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork Prevention Plan (2007). The Overall Goal is to Save Lives in Utah. Retrieved 

March 8, 2008, from  http://iicrc.med.utah.edu/ publications/UtahStateDrug Addiction in Spanish Fork PreventionPla 051007.pdf

 

Kinkead L.D, Romboy D. (2006, April 24). Deadly Taboo: Youth Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork an epidemic that many

in Utah Prefer to ignore. Deseret Morning News. Retrieved March 7, 2008, from

         http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,635201873,00.html

 

Murphy, G. E. (1998, November 12). Why Women Are Less Likely Than Men To

         Commit Drug Addiction in Spanish Fork. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 20, 2008, from 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981112075159.htm

 

Bernick, B. Jr. (2007, April 18). Utah sees big surge in gun permits. Deseret Morning News. 

Retrieved March 7, 2008, from http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,660212830,00.html

 

Houle, J., Chagnon, F., & Mishara, B. L. (April 2008). An empirical test of a mediation model of 

the impact of the traditional male gender role on suicidal behavior in men. Journal of 

         Effective Disorders, 107(1-3), 37-43.

 
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Drug Rehab Provo Utah


Drug rehab in American Fork is a proven and powerful process which can help individuals resolve even the most serious cases of drug or alcohol addiction. Rather than being disheartened by futile efforts to quit on one’s own, men and women who are struggling with addiction can have hope that there are rehab answers which can help resolve their addiction issues once and for all. There is no reason to live another moment addicted to drugs or alcohol, when there are a variety of rehabilitation options at American Fork, Utah drug treatment facilities. Trained alcohol and drug treatment counselors are knowledgable and experienced in helping individuals deal with any kind of addiction, whether it be illicit street drugs, prescription medicine or alcohol. Whatever the circumstances or situation may be, people who are addicted to drugs should get treatment as soon as they can at a drug rehab in American Fork, UT. before it is too late.

Individuals who won’t easily be convinced to get help at a drug rehab in American Fork may require an additional thrust from family and intimate friends. Friends and family can be discouraged and lose any hopes that their loved one may ever get the help they will need, and many people will die because of drug or alcohol addiction each year because they don’t. Whether it is pride, feelings of guilt or deep denial which retains them in a lifestyle of drug addiction and out of rehabilitation, everything ought to be done at all costs to obtain help for them before they are also a casualty to drug addiction. If begging them does not go anywhere, a drug intervention has proven to persuade even the most stubborn and tough addicts and expedited them into drug rehab in American Fork, Utah to avoid further consequences and casualties. Consult with a treatment professional at a drug rehab in American Fork, UT. who can help arrange an intervention and join intervention participants with a expert drug interventionist who will make the process a success.

Individuals do not become addicted and stay on drugs and alcohol because they harbor ill will or malicious, they do so due to an extreme physical and mental dependence to their substance of choice which is nearly impossible to break the cycle of without effective support. In a drug rehab in American Fork, individuals in treatment will have a feeling of comfort in knowing that professional rehabilitation counselors understand fully what individuals will have to overcome during the treatment process and it is by no means a walk in the park. Rehabilitation counselors also understand that while coming off of drugs or alcohol and going through detoxification can appear to be a big step to conquer, it is just a tiny step of a significantly more substantial treatment process that will require complete commitment and focus from both treatment clients and treatment staff at a drug rehab in American Fork, Utah or the surrounding areas. Ultimately, it is their purpose is to make sure people are rehabilitated not just abstinent.

In the more successful drug rehab programs in American Fork, UT. that work to resolve drug addiction fully after detoxification and withdrawal, clients will participate in intensive therapy and other treatment tactics to help find sobriety from the inside out. The motives behind why individuals become involved in drug use are rarely physical in nature, and are more commonly of a mental and emotional nature. To only deal with and find resolution to the physical aspect of drug or alcohol addiction is would be an injustice to the individual, simply because they will surely end up back on drugs as soon as they leave drug rehab. Treatment specialists will spend considerable amounts of time and go to great lengths to get to the bottom of these issues on a client-by-client basis, because each person is unique in their treatment requirements. Counseling will help expose such issues and obtaining knowledge about yourself, others and drug addiction will help the individual to recognize things in their lives they need to adjust to remain sober.

The quantity of time needed in a drug rehab in American Fork can vary significantly from person to person. Who is to say that one particular individual in drug rehab may not have more considerable problems to resolve than another person ? For this reason, it is critical that rehab staff constantly evaluate each individual’s treatment requirements and advancement, to ensure that they remain in rehab as long as needed to make certain that they experience a complete recovery. Based off of statistics, men and women do a lot superior in terms of immediate and long-term results in an inpatient or residential drug rehab in American Fork, Utah which requires at least a 3 month stay. These more superior kinds of drug rehab in American Fork, UT. are much more successful in approaching drug or alcohol addiction due to the fact the individual won’t be distracted while taking part in treatment process and will typically be permitted to remain in drug and alcohol treatment as long as necessary based on their progress and results.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction and wants to find a way out, get in touch with a professional rehab specialist at a drug rehab in American Fork right away. Get any questions answered, and determine which actions should be taken on an immediate basis to either get help for yourself or someone you care about. This may call for a drug intervention, which may also be done right away to get the ball rolling.

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Inpatient Drug Treatment Program Orem Utah


An residential drug and alcohol rehab facility in Orem is a place for men and women to heal from addiction and avail themselves of tools and methods of treatment which will assist them to be able to remain drug-free and make a new life for themselves. Residential Drug treatment facilities in Orem, Utah offer services to individuals who are addicted to any type of drug or substance, and who are experiencing any stage of dependence and addiction. Even the hardest cases of addiction can be resolved, and even those who have been labeled as a lost cause can be treated and entirely rehabilitated in a drug treatment facility in Orem, UT..

But residential drug treatment isn’t just for hardcore addicts, and anybody who is encountering difficulty with substance abuse of any sort can discover solace and efficient treatment which can aid them to get a handle on addiction and their life. The process of treatment begins with drug or alcohol detox to support the person through the bodily and mental symptoms of drug withdrawal and to ensure they are no longer high or experiencing the effects of drugs or alcohol. The drug treatment process then continues with an intensive course of counseling and a variety of forms of treatment aimed at handling issues which may be hanging them up in life and triggering them to turn to drugs as a solution or to self medicate as is usually the case.

As soon as an individual is in an residential drug treatment facility in Orem, treatment professionals will guarantee that there is a full evaluation done of their drug history and physical and psychological state to make sure that a custom treatment curriculum is in place which will assist them, not on becoming abstinent, but confident that they will never turn to drugs again in the future. The more superior drug treatment facilities in Orem, Utah provide long term residential or inpatient care. These kinds of programs have the highest success rates in terms of treatment and individuals remaining drug free long after treatment is completed.

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Residential Drug Rehab Center Orem Utah


People in Orem, UT. who are addicted to drugs are often not strong willed enough to recognize they have a problem and reach out to get the help they need in an residential drug treatment facility. This deep denial ends tragically for so many each year in Orem and in the state, with many addicted individuals losing their lives to addiction in the end. Whether the individual is addicted to illicit street drugs such as heroin, cocaine, or methamphetamine or is caught up in alcoholism, addiction to any of these substances can occur in a heartbeat and so many negative effects can result. As many know, addiction doesn’t just affect the addict but also affects friends, family members and many others. It can be challenging to restore these relationships because of the damage done, and unless something effective is done to get the person real recovery help, all will be lost.

Family members, friends and others who are concerned can make a concerted effort and help influence the person to get help by conducting a drug intervention. Instead of witnessing the person decay further and further, concerned loved ones can come together and let the person know how drugs and addiction are destroying their lives and relationships and what they stand to lose if they don’t get help. A drug intervention is a meeting which is orchestrated ahead of time, typically with the help of a professional drug interventionist who can help make the process a smooth and effective one. Intervention participants will be instructed on how to write letters which will be read at the intervention, and at the end of the confrontation the person will be offered recovery at an residential drug treatment center.

Anyone who wants to perform a drug intervention for a loved one or friend can enlist the help of a drug interventionist or speak with a treatment counselor at an residential drug treatment facility in Orem, Utah who can help explain the process. All preparations for their arrival to a professional drug rehab facility should be made well ahead of time so that once they agree to accept help they can leave quickly without any time for second thoughts. This will ensure they don’t have any time to second guess their decision, do one last drug binge etc. which could be a very dangerous situation.

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Residential Utah Drug Treatment Facility


 

Residential Utah Drug Treatment Facility | Residential Drug Abuse Rehab Facility Utah

Over the years there have been a wide variety of residential drug treatment program philosophies in Orem, Utah which have emerged, some of which have proven highly advantageous and some of which have proven to be entirely ineffective and unworkable. For quite some time it has been the consensus of specialists that addiction is a disease. This well propagandized philosophy purports that men and women are addicts indefinitely, even if they continue to be drug free and/or sober for the rest of their lives after having been addicted to drugs or alcohol at some point prior. Other residential drug treatment program philosophies educate that one’s addiction is not in their control, which also provides them a handicap and doesn’t give them a outlined resolution to the problem.

The residential drug rehab program philosophies in Orem, UT. which are proving to be extremely effective in terms of long term abstinence and treatment are not those which take the power away from the person and victimize them, but those which help the particular person to take responsibility and overcome addiction confidently and resolutely. There are many residential Orem drug treatment programs which utilize proven treatment methods which include behavioral therapy and intensive counseling and therapy to help men and women discover what caused their addiction and what can be done to stay away from these same situations in the future. These drug treatment programphilosophies educate the individual that they have the power to handle their troubles in life without turning to drugs or alcohol. Individuals can and have been rehabilitated to that point where they don’t need to be labeled with a sickness or as an addict for the rest of their lives, all with the help of effective treatment at an residential drug and alcohol treatment program in Orem, Utah with such a philosophy.

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Narcan Saving Lives


Steve Wohlen lay on his front lawn, blue, unconscious and barely breathing, overdosing on heroin.

His mother ran outside, frantically assembling a pen-like canister. Her heart pounding, she dropped to her knees and used the device to deliver two squirts up her son’s nostrils.

Within minutes, his eyes opened, color returned to his face, and he sat up – brought back from a potentially lethal overdose by a drug commonly known by its old brand name, Narcan.

The drug, widely sold under its generic name, naloxone, counteracts the effects of heroin, OxyContin and other powerful painkillers and has been routinely used by ambulance crews and emergency rooms in the U.S. for decades. But in the past few years, public health officials across the nation have been distributing it free to addicts and their loved ones, as well as to some police and firefighters.

Such giveaways may have saved more than 10,000 lives since the first program was started in 1996 in Chicago, according to a survey by the Harm Reduction Coalition, a national group that works to reduce the consequences of drug use.

Opponents say that making the antidote so easily available is an accommodation to drug use that could make addicts less likely to seek drug treatment in Utah. The objections are not unlike those raised decades ago when addicts were first issued clean needles to curb the spread of AIDS. But Wohlen and his mother see things differently.

“I just didn’t want to be that mother standing next to that casket,” Linda Wohlen said.

Supporters of the distribution programs say getting naloxone into drug users’ homes saves lives that might otherwise be lost waiting for an ambulance.

“The question has always been: How can we get people treated before they die? If an overdose of the drug is taken at home, you won’t have enough time to get that patient to the emergency room before respiratory depression leads to death,” said Dr. Russell Portenoy, chairman of pain medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York.

 

The problem has become more urgent: Heroin overdose deaths in the U.S. nearly doubled over the last decade, from 1,725 in 1999 to 3,278 in 2009, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. During the same period, deadly overdoses from opiate-like drugs, including painkillers, have nearly quadrupled, from 4,030 to 15,597.

Naloxone works by blocking certain drug receptors in the brain. It has no effect on alcohol or cocaine overdoses but can be used against such painkillers as OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin.

Normally available only by prescription, it is issued to people like Linda Wohlen through 50 programs in more than 188 locations around the country, including Baltimore, New York and San Francisco, according to the survey, published in February by the CDC. Thousands of people have been trained to use injectable and nasal spray forms of the drug.

Other countries are also distributing the drug to the public, including Britain, Ukraine, Russia and Kazakhstan.

Most of the U.S. programs are run by state or local health departments and addiction support groups.

“If you’ve ever talked to a parent who watched their kid overdose, you wouldn’t wonder why we are doing this,” said Hilary Jacobs, deputy director of the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services in Massachusetts, where state officials began a distribution program in 2007 that they say has saved about 1,300 lives. The state has spent about $841,000 issuing free naloxone, each dose costing the Public Health Department $16.

In New Mexico, which has one of the highest drug overdose death rates in the country, health officials estimate the statewide naloxone distribution program that began in 2001 has counteracted 3,000 overdoses.

In Wilkes County, N.C., an Appalachian area with an alarmingly high rate of prescription drug deaths, a nonprofit organization called Project Lazarus has taken a slightly different approach: It persuaded doctors to prescribe naloxone in tandem with painkillers to certain patients. The practice, along with an all-out education campaign, has been credited by the organization with reducing overdose deaths 69 percent between 2009 and 2011.

Fred Wells Brason II, chief executive of Project Lazarus, said he had never heard of naloxone when the group began to develop its overdose prevention plan.

“Then I found out it was used in emergency rooms to reverse opiate overdoses,” he recalled. “My first question was, `Well, that’s great, but not one person from Wilkes County who overdoses made it that far. They were all found at home dead.'”

William Breault, a neighborhood activist in Worcester, Mass., opposed the distribution site set up in his city.

“I just feel that the focus and our dollars should be getting people off drugs, into recovery and treatment,” he said. “This policy is one of accommodation to anti-social behavior. Absolutely, it sends a false message that this is the silver bullet, this will take care of you if you overdose.”

Police in Quincy, Mass., began carrying naloxone in late 2010, courtesy of the state, after grappling with one of the highest non-fatal overdose rates in Massachusetts. Since then, officers have used it to reverse 69 overdoses.

Patrolman Michael Brandolini said he once saved two people in a single day: a man whose mother found him unconscious in his bedroom, and a man lying in a snowbank.

“I think it’s fine in the hands of first responders – police, fire and paramedics,” Brandolini said. “Personally, I have reservations about giving it to the addicts themselves. I think it may give them a false sense of security.”

He said he worries addicts will think they can administer naloxone to themselves, when it is almost always given by someone else – a friend or loved one – because the drug user loses consciousness.

The Food and Drug Administration, together with the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the CDC, held a workshop earlier this month to gather public opinion on making naloxone more widely available.

Among those testifying were advocates for distribution programs, those who believe the antidote should be made available over the counter, and those opposed to its use by anyone but doctors and emergency workers.

In Massachusetts, Wohlen said he was angry rather than grateful when he woke up that night two years ago, his high suddenly gone, replaced by withdrawal symptoms that he described as feeling like a terrible case of the flu.

Wohlen was out on bail for robbing a fast-food restaurant when he overdosed, and was sent back to prison because of his drug use. Now serving five to seven years behind bars in Massachusetts, the 28-year-old said in a recent prison interview that he is clean and has signed up for a prison training program to learn the heating and ventilation trade.

He said the naloxone that his mother used made it possible: “I might be dead if she hadn’t done it.”

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Utah’s Substance of Denial


SALT LAKE CITY — More people died in Utah last year of prescription pain medication overdoses than traffic accidents, according to police and doctors who treat substance abuse patients.

“It’s a big problem here in the state of Utah. I’d say we are up near the top in the country, and that’s unusual for substance abuse,” said Dr. Glen Hanson, director of the Utah Addiction Center at the University of Utah. “For almost every other drug of abuse, whether its tobacco, or alcohol, or cocaine, or heroin, we’re usually way down near the lowest in the country.”

Furthermore, abuse of prescription pain medication and other pharmaceuticals streches across all ages and walks of life.

On Monday, the Drug Enforcement Agency announced the arrest of Salt Lake City Justice Court Judge Virginia Bauskett Ward, 45, for investigation of drug distribution. Investigators say Ward received a package of 338 oxycodone pills mailed via the U.S. Postal Service from Las Vegas.

She allegedly was going to deliver the pills to someone else, according to the DEA. Law enforcers did not say Monday whether Ward was believed to be abusing the powerful pain medication as well as distributing it.

Her arrest was part of an investigation that began in California. Additional arrests in Utah, Nevada and California are likely, according to the DEA.

Michael Crookston, medical director of the Dayspring treatment programs for chemical dependence at LDS Hospital, said OxyContin abuse has decreased in recent years because drug manufacturers have built safeguards in to the pills to prevent addicts from crushing them open and taking all their contents at once.

But that, he said, has lead to an increased abuse of oxycodone, also known as Roxicodone or just Roxys, as well as another drug.

“That (plan) backfired, I think, a bit. The intention was less OxyContin, but it’s actually lead to more heroin use,” he said. “I haven’t heard of anybody abusing OxyContin for a while now. It’s all oxycodone.”

According to the Utah Substance Abuse and Mental Health’s annual report for 2012, an average of 23 Utahns die each month from prescription opioid abuse. Since 2000, the number of deaths due to overdose of pain medication has risen more than 400 percent.

“Equally concerning, the abuse of prescription painkillers among teens now ranks second — only behind marijuana — as the nation’s most prevalent illegal drug problem. One in 10 12th-graders reported having misused a prescription pain medication,” according to the report.

Crookston said he sees the same thing in his office.

“Younger people think, ‘Well, my mother takes it so it must be safe,’ and it’s not. We have an epidemic of prescription opiate abuse in the U.S. that’s killing people. More people die of prescription pain pill overdoses than die on the highways, and that’s been true in Utah for several years now,” he said.

The number of people admitted for substance abuse in public treatment facilities increased in Utah by more than 700 from 2011 to 2012, according to the report. While alcohol was the most abused drug and methamphetamine second, “if you combine the illicit opioids (heroin) and the prescription opioids (methadone, oxycodone, hydrocodone), this category would surpass methamphetamine,” the report stated.

Opiates became the second most used drug after alcohol among 25- to 34-year-olds, according to the report, and is the third drug of choice for people 35 to 64 years old.

More than 72 percent of adults in substance abuse treatment statewide had a high school diploma, and 23 percent had some type of college training, the report found.

“Women tend be admitted to treatment more frequently than men for prescription drugs,” the report found.

“(Oxycodone) is a very addicting drug. Its widely prescriped for pain, and some people become addicted,” Crookstone said. “It’s a good pain medication for the right person. But some people do become addicted to it and lose control.”

Prescription pain meds are easily bought and sold on the street, he said. Some people will sell their extra pills they may have originally received for a legitimate reason. Some people will still try to “doctor shop.” And some will just steal the oxydodone, he said.

“I heard in some high schools, it’s easier to get pills than marijuana because it’s easier to conceal,” Crookston said. “It’s just pervasive, it’s widespread, and it effects all age groups, even teenagers. It takes over a person’s life. They lose control, and it robs them of everything. They lose their jobs, their families, eventually. It doesn’t start out that way. People start out just wanting to feel good.”

Peter Reilly, 21, came to Utah from Arizona to seek substance abuse treatment. He said he started taking prescription meds when he was 14. But recreational use eventually became an everyday event. And when that high wasn’t enough, he turned to heroin.

“Your body gets used to it. And then eventually, you don’t have it, you get sick,” Reilly said. “You know the one thing that will make that go away is the drug. That’s why it leads people to do crazy things to get it.”

Reilly said he never dreamed that one day he’d be a heroin user.

“That drug took everything away from me. You start stealing to get what you want. You start lying. You lose trust from your friends and family,” he said.

And it all started because of an addiction to prescription meds.

“Just because it’s a pill doesn’t mean it’s all right. It will take everything away from you if it gets to that point,” Reilly said.

Part of the problem with prescription drug addiction and raising awareness is that some don’t think of it as being as serious of a drug problem as cocaine and heroin, Hanson said. Not only are prescription medications legal, they’re not as “dirty” as sticking a needle into an arm, he said, which is one of the reasons people become addicted.

“If you’ve gotten into trouble, there was probably legitimate reasons you started using it, and you probably let it get out of hand,” Crookston said. “It’s a victim mindset for prescription drug abuse. Whereas, if you’re abusing these other drugs, we think, ‘Oh, you went out and looked for trouble, and you got it.’ We’re not nearly as kind and less judgmental with those people.”

April 27 is National Take-Back Day, a nationwide effort for people to dispose of any unused or expired medications. The effort is backed in part by the DEA. Information on where to drop off pills can be found at

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Young Girl Fights Traumatic Teen Years to Overcome Addiction


My excuse

When I was 12 my father got sick, I was 13 when he passed away. The drugs started to escalate from that point. Imagine a person losing someone then using it as an excuse. If I went out and got high again it was easier to escape that pain just as easy as it was to escape grieving.

Because of the effects of like my drugs and alcohol abuse had on my school work I went from before in the middle school, a B and C average, nothing stellar but still being a functioning person in school, to getting Fs, incompletes, not showing up to school at all, I think I had 38 absences in 9th grade. I kept milking the grieving saying, I didn’t feel like going to school cause I didn’t want to be around people that were going ask questions or make me feel uncomfortable.

(Smiling young Daytop client)
(Daytop client with mother and brother)
(border around photo)
 

I wanted to fit in

The choice I made was to be with the negative crowd because that’s the one that is always talked about and is always in the center of everything. One night I was asked to go with them and they were all drinking. I wanted to fit in, of course I had to show off, I had to be the one drinking more than everybody else. And then the police came there. They were called I guess by someone who saw what we were doing and then they started to search us and I was the only one who had drugs on them. I had 300 Vicodin, which was a felony. I was put on probation and they said I could get put into a group home, or I could join a rehabilitation program. So I didn’t know what Daytop was really, I know it was a rehabilitation center and I agreed to it.

Everything had to change

They said that a lot of things are going to have to change. That I couldn’t keep in contact with the old negative friends that were pulling me down and that I was allowing to pull me down and me distancing myself from my family.

One day, I had got caught because I was drinking on the weekend and they caught me and someone asked me, “How long can you lie to yourself for?” And I thought, “Lying to myself? I’m lying to all you guys, I’m not lying to myself. I know who I am.” And the counselor asked me, “Who are you?” And, I was blank. I couldn’t name one thing about myself. I knew I liked to get high, I knew that I was running. I realized that, I haven’t done one productive thing in 3 years.

I started believing

That actually was the first time I looked and realized that what I was doing was wrong and that I was lying to myself. And that how long can I run for until everything catches up with me. I’d already given up on high school, failing, almost expelled. That’s when I started believing what they were saying at Daytop and that the things that they say to you isn’t just some hoopla that you know you hear everyday it’s actually true life.

My grades went up and I saw how happy I was making my mom and how happy I was making myself, how pleased I was getting and I went from hanging onto these negative beliefs to sharing and working through them, and moving on and then, you know, going to school at Daytop and getting Bs and my mom smiling when I came home instead of, you know, always worrying about me.

A complete turnaround

I came back into mainstream school when I was in the eleventh grade, and I started bringing home A’s and B’s. I left school failing, I came back getting A’s and B’s. It was a complete turnaround, you know. The period in between me failing and getting A’s was because of Daytop. I don’t know what I would have done if I hadn’t gone there. I don’t know if I would be here today if I hadn’t gone there, it completely changed my life and I owe it to them. The changes I made while in Daytop are the reason why I’m doing so good now, is why I’m having such a positive life now.

I have a future and lots of support

And now, I’m holding onto it with both hands and I’m just going with it, you know, I’m planning on graduating high school, I’m planning on moving on to college, I want to graduate college. I want to go to law school and when I tell my mom, she’s happy, she’s proud, she smiles, she says “good for you. You know, you have goals for yourself, look at what you did for yourself. Be proud.” And it’s sort of a weird feeling, because I didn’t have that. I had, “Oh what are you doing tonight, Did you do your homework?”

And, now I’m having,“Congratulations you graduated high school! You’re going to go to college. Whatever you need, I’ll be there for you.” All that support, all the trust, all the family concepts that I was building back up, stronger than they were before. And experiencing that was out of this world it was better than any drug I’ve ever done.

 

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Substance Abuse Statistics Utah


Any Illicit Drug Addiction or Drug Abuse in Utah Over a One Year Period (Annual Averages Based on 2002 and 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health):

  • In Utah it was estimated on a survey-weighted hierarchical Bayes estimation approach that the total number of individuals with an illicit drug addiction or drug abuse problem over a one year period was 52,000. For this estimation illicit drugs includes marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically

Any Illicit Drug Use Other Than Marijuana in Utah Over a One Month Period (Annual Averages Based on 2002 and 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health):

  • In Utah it was estimated on a survey-weighted hierarchical Bayes estimation approach that the total number of illicit drug users other than marijuana users in a one month period was 68,000. For this estimation illicit drugs include cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically
    • An estimated 12,000 of illicit drug users other than marijuana users in Utah over a one month period were between the ages of 12-17 years old.
    • An estimated 26,000 of illicit drug users other than marijuana users in Utah over a one month period were between the ages of 18-25 years old.
    • An estimated 29,000 of illicit drug users other than marijuana users in Utah over a one month period were 26 or older.

Illicit Drug Use in Utah Over a One Month Period (Annual Averages Based on 2002 and 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health):

  • In Utah it was estimated on a survey-weighted hierarchical Bayes estimation approach that the total number of illicit substance abuser in utah in a one month period was 115,000. For this estimation illicit drugs include marijuana/hashish, cocaine (including crack), heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, or any prescription-type psychotherapeutic used nonmedically
    • An estimated 20,000 of the illicit drug users in Utah were between the ages of 12-17 years old.
    • An estimated 46,000 of the illicit drug users in Utah were between the ages of 18-25 years old.
    • An estimated 49,000 of the illicit substance abuse in Utah were 26 or older.
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Substance Abuse Treatment Utah


Substance Abuse Treatment Utah

Providers around Utah will tell you that the substance abuse problem in Utah is becoming an overwhelming problem scattered across the Wasatch front. Utah ranks second in the nation in prescription substance abuse. Our Drug Rehab and Alcohol Treatment Center in Utah uses common treatment modality along side the healing power of the atonement of Jesus Christ. Our Substance Abuse Treatment Program in UT uses an evidence based peer reviewed treatment approach ensuring our clients are given the opportunity to maintain sobriety and recovery on a level they are comfortable with. Utah has come a long way in treating addiction over the past decade but still remains behind the ball when it comes to the proper resources being allocated for the indigent population. Substance Abuse Treatment is becoming more readily available through private resources but over 21,000 people are in need of treatment services throughout Utah in which they are unavailable. 

Utah has seen a rise in women using drugs and alcohol and a higher need for inpatient women treatment for substance abuse is becoming an ever growing need. Many believe that once an addict or alcoholic enters treatment the problem has been taken care of, in the latter that is hardly the case. Families carry the burden of many of the behaviors associated with the individual who is using drugs and alcohol and substance abuse treatment in Utah is needed for the entire family and those closest to the individual for everyone to truly heal from the devastating attributes associated with the disease. 

Addiction is related 50% genetically along side sociological, familial and many other circumstances that may lead to the use of mind and mood altering substances. More often then not an individual will begin abusing substances as a result of  trauma or other emotional disturbances that lead to the individual trying to cope with the many things that have led them to substance abuse treatment in Utah. Most will associate the bad behavior the individual incorporates with the addictive cycle as the trauma that unravels as an individual uses drugs and alcohol. When in fact the individual has gone through far greater emotional, mental and even physical trauma long before the individual began using drugs and alcohol.

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